Ashley, 23
Mother of two, soon to be divorced,
fiercely pro choice, no religion for me thank you.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from sktagg23  26 notes

queenc92:

One thing girls are taught growing up is that you should have a boyfriend otherwise you’re “incomplete” or some shit. But the moment a girl decides on her own that she wants a boyfriend and actively tries to get one she’s labeled “desperate”. 

Reblogged from sktagg23  132,245 notes
reclaimingthelatinatag:

asexualthings:

Asexuality is an orientation in which a person does not experience sexual attraction to any sex and/or gender. They do not feel an intrinsic desire to make sex a part of their relationships with other people. However they may still be able to experience other types of attraction, and desire relationships with other people.
Check out the following websites to learn more about asexuality, join in on the community, and/or help increase asexual visibility and education.
Asexual Visibility and Education Network
International Asexuality Conference(Worldpride Toronto 2014 Affiliate Event) (June 28, 2014)
Asexual Things (asexual vis/ed tumblr blog)
Frequently Asked Questions
Asexuality Websites/Blogs/etc

Asexual Latin@s for the win! :D

reclaimingthelatinatag:

asexualthings:

Asexuality is an orientation in which a person does not experience sexual attraction to any sex and/or gender. They do not feel an intrinsic desire to make sex a part of their relationships with other people. However they may still be able to experience other types of attraction, and desire relationships with other people.

Check out the following websites to learn more about asexuality, join in on the community, and/or help increase asexual visibility and education.

Asexual Visibility and Education Network

International Asexuality Conference
(Worldpride Toronto 2014 Affiliate Event) (June 28, 2014)

Asexual Things (asexual vis/ed tumblr blog)

Asexual Latin@s for the win! :D

Reblogged from sktagg23  16,481 notes

Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

“The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.

By

PBS: Language as Prejudice - Myth #6: Women Talk Too Much (via misandry-mermaid)

Every EVERY women’s studies class I’ve been in has had this problem and failed to address it. 

(via iamayoungfeminist)

Reblogged from howprolifeofyou  2,429 notes

Someone walks over to our step to say hello. She bends at the waist, looming over Brooke.

Brooke doesn’t look up. She doesn’t stop stripping her stick.

Dig. Pull. Dig. Pull.

Our visitor reaches out a hand and cups it below Brooke’s chin.

I freeze. Oh God.

She uses the hand to pull Brooke’s head up by the jaw.

A thin line of panic starts somewhere deep. I know that Brooke is going to scream. 5,4,3,2 …

She does scream, but not in the way that I expect.

“I HATE BEING TOUCHED!!” she shouts.

I am flabbergasted.

Words. Self-awareness. Communication. Self-advocacy.

I know the sentence will need to be reformatted. But I am drenched in pride.

I turn to Brooke. “Great job telling us how you feel, Brooke. Really great job.” I hope that my words send a message to both of them. I stand with my girl.

Our visitor is undaunted.

“I just want to see that beautiful face,” she says. “Lift up for me.”

I am stymied by etiquette. By deference to our host. By generational difference. By convention.

Brooke is not.

She lifts her head as instructed. And growls.

By

This has probably been posted before, but this knocks me for a loop - a blogger and her autistic daughter had the opportunity to meet Suzanne Wright of Autism Speaks, and this is how one of the noisiest voice in the autism community treated her daughter.

What knocks me for a loop isn’t so much Wright’s awful behavior. It’s the unbelievable strength and self-advocacy that the blogger Jess’s daughter, Brooke, shows when someone violates her personal space. It’s her mother backing her up for making sure someone knows that they are not permitted to touch her unless she says it’s okay. Honestly, it’s heartening. I hope Wright felt real fucking uncomfortable. She should.

(via chantrykomori) YOU GO, GIRL!!!!! (via primadraggle)